The Joplin Globe, Joplin, MO

Business

August 21, 2013

Stocks fall ahead of Fed meeting minutes

NEW YORK — Stocks edged lower Wednesday as investors waited to hear from the Federal Reserve about what’s next for its massive bond-buying program. More disappointing news from retailers also dragged the market lower.

In early trading, the Dow Jones industrial average lost 40 points, or 0.3 percent, to 14,965, on pace to close below 15,000 for the first time since July 3.

The Standard & Poor’s 500 index fell two points, or 0.1 percent, to 1,650. The Nasdaq composite edged down a fraction to 3,613.

The Federal Reserve will release minutes from its July monetary policy meeting at 2 p.m. EDT. Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke said in mid-June that the central bank may begin to pull back on its bond-buying program, which has been in place in one form or another since late 2008 to keep interest rates low and encourage economic growth.

“Unless the Fed gives us great news, there’s more to go with this correction that started two weeks ago,” said Brian Reynolds, chief market strategist at Rosenblatt Securities.

Stocks have been slumping since Aug. 2, when the Dow and S&P 500 closed at all-time highs, as traders worry about weak earnings and how and when the Fed will wind down its bond purchases. The Dow has lost 4.6 percent since then.

Reynolds said he thinks the market is on track to close 10 percent below its recent peak, what’s known on Wall Street as a correction.

Bond yields have risen dramatically in the last few weeks as investors anticipate the end of the Fed’s program. The yield on the U.S. 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.86 percent Wednesday, up from 2.81 percent the day before and 2.71 percent a week ago.

Retail stocks were once again in focus, and not in a good way. Target, like many other retailers in the last two weeks, issued a muted sales outlook for the rest of the year. The stock dropped $1.63, or 2.3 percent, to $66.36.

American Eagle Outfitters plunged $1.29, or 8 percent, to $15.11 after reporting that it had to slash prices because shoppers are so reluctant to spend. American Eagle is the latest teen-apparel retailer to report disappointing earnings or cut their outlook, following Urban Outfitters and others.

Staples plunged $2.27, or 14 percent, to $14.57 after the office supplies chain reported earnings and sales that missed analysts’ expectations. The company also slashed its full-year profit forecast.

One bright spot in retail was Home Depot competitor Lowe’s, which was up 5 percent, making it the biggest gainer in the S&P 500. The home-improvement retail chain said it earned 88 cents per share in the period ending Aug. 2, ahead of analysts’ expectations of 79 cents per share, according to FactSet. The company also raised its full-year sales and profit forecasts, citing the improving outlook for the U.S. housing market.

 

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