The Joplin Globe, Joplin, MO

June 28, 2013

Museum features collection of famous vehicles

By Dave Woods
Digital market development manager

BRANSON, Mo. — Kathy Velvet grew up in museums.

Not art museums filled with Monets, Manets and Rembrandts, though. The collections Velvet remembers were filled with all-American Elvis memorabilia. The King's cars, bling and jumpsuits are a cherished part of her past.

"Our family got into the museum business in 1978," said Velvet, owner of the Celebrity Car Museum in Branson. "We started the Elvis Presley Museum across from Graceland. We collected Elvis' cars, rings, jumpsuits and all kinds of memorabilia."

At their peak, she said, the family had the largest collection of Elvis memorabilia outside of Graceland, Presley's iconic estate. At one point, the family owned and curated half a dozen Elvis collections around the country.

"We were the only licensed (Elvis) museums outside of Graceland," she said.

The family had a 15-year contract with the Presley estate and, at the end the agreement, they looked for a different type of business plan.

"We sold Graceland five of the (Elvis) automobiles with which they started their auto museum," she said. "We had Elvis' white Rolls Royce and his extended, navy blue Mercedes and the 'Spinout' car."

The Elvis Cobra 427 "Spinout" car was used in a 1966 movie musical of the same name, in which Elvis portrayed a singing race driver.



'Sell the sizzle'

The Velvets' obsession wasn't limited to Elvis memorabilia. It has always been a family obsession.

It continues today: Since June 1, 2012, Velvet, her son and a loyal group of staff operate the Celebrity Car Museum in the Dick Clark American Bandstand complex on the Branson Strip. The museum houses more than 80 vintage cars, trucks, custom rods, cycles and movie machines made famous by Hollywood and the stars who drove them.

"We're all sort of history buffs," she said. "When we go to any museum, we are looking at the research and how do they attach all of those things to the walls. It's all about presentation. We had The Blues Museum on Beale Street (in Memphis) and then we started with the Celebrity Car Museums."

Velvet said she and her clan of collectors know what people want to see and, more profitably, want to own.

When it comes to moving memorabilia of any kind, Velvet said, you must "sell the sizzle and not the steak," as the classic marketing phrase coined by Larry Slater goes.

"Having dealt with the Elvis business all those years, the deal is if you don't have sizzle it doesn't really sell," she said.

At their Branson museum, Velvet said she can see what makes visitors sizzle.

"The 'Back to the Future' car is really popular," said Velvet. "We call it The Time Machine. The Batmobile is really popular. We are now showing the '89 Batmobile, because the '66 we sold."

Velvet is always looking for new inventory for the ever-changing collection. They sold the vintage '60s Batmobile at a Cox Auto Auction in April. The Cox Auction, the largest automotive sale in the nation, is where the best of the best roll onto the auction block.

"We have our eyes on another Batmobile," she said. "If my son can convince me that we can make money on it, then it's a buy. He really does know what sells. We've had other Batmobiles.

While Velvet didn't say how much she got for Batman and Robin's ride, she did admit: "We sold ours too cheap. The last one went for $250K."

Almost all of the vehicles housed at the Branson attraction are for sale Ñ for the right price, that is. Currently, Velvet said, they are in the market for one of the industry's most rare celebrity cars.

"The 'Eleanor' from the 'Gone in 60 Seconds' movie is a rare find," she said. "That's really hard to get a hold of, but we are looking for one."



'Snazzy car'

Velvet said that of all the cool cars the museum collection contains, she would most like to take one particular car out for a spin around town.

"I think the Shelby Series 1 would be the coolest to take out on the streets," she said. "It's very rare. They sold one like it at Barrett-Jackson (Auto Auction) for a price of $150,000."

The Series 1, according to car collectors' websites, is the only Shelby original completely designed and built by Carroll Shelby. He assembled the high performance car from the ground up, Velvet said. Shelby is considered the father of high performance specialty cars, Velvet said.

One collection on loan is owned by the Velvet's landlord and not for sale. Others are consigned by owners looking to unload their investment vehicles. When visitors enter the attraction they are offered a menu detailing each vehicles specs, history, lineage and price tag.

"We hand out notebooks with the most current prices," the savvy buyer and seller said. "We've sold quite a few for the people who are consigners. We are just representing the owners and put them on contact with the sellers and help them sell their cars. We are always looking and always buying."



For sale

Want to go?

The Velvet Collection: Celebrity Car Museum is open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Sunday. It is located at 1600 West 76 Country Blvd. Details: 417-239-1644, www.celebritycarmuseum.com.