The Joplin Globe, Joplin, MO

National News

January 20, 2014

New Jersey mayor ratchets up allegation against Christie

TRENTON, N.J. — The Democratic mayor of a town severely flooded by Superstorm Sandy has ratcheted up her allegation that Republican Gov. Chris Christie’s administration tied recovery funds to her support for a prime real estate project and said that she turned over documents to a federal prosecutor investigating his staff.

While a spokesman for Christie called Hoboken Mayor Dawn Zimmer’s claims “categorically false,” Zimmer said she met with federal prosecutors in Newark for several hours Sunday at their request and turned over a journal and other documents.

On Saturday, Zimmer said Christie’s lieutenant governor, Kim Guadagno, and a top community development official separately told her that recovery funds would flow to her city if she expedited the commercial development project by the New York-based Rockefeller Group.

On Sunday, she went a step further and said on CNN’s “State of the Union with Candy Crowley” that Guadagno told her that the request “was a direct message from the governor.”

“The lieutenant governor pulled me aside and said, essentially, ‘You’ve got to move forward with the Rockefeller project. This project is really important to the governor.’ And she said that she had been with him on Friday night and that this was a direct message from the governor,” Zimmer recalled Guadagno saying.

Christie spokesman Colin Reed issued a statement Sunday saying, “Mayor Zimmer’s categorization about her conversation in Hoboken is categorically false.”

Zimmer said in a statement Sunday night that she will “provide any requested information and testify under oath about the facts of what happened when the Lieutenant Governor came to Hoboken and told me that Sandy aid would be contingent on moving forward with a private development project.”

Hoboken, a low-lying city of 50,000 across from Manhattan, was nearly swallowed by the Hudson River during Sandy, with three of its electrical substations and most of its firehouses flooded, businesses and homes submerged, the train station inundated with water, and people trapped in high-rises because elevators didn’t work and lobbies were underwater. Zimmer has proposed a comprehensive flood mitigation plan and has applied for $100 million in grants to help make it happen.

Zimmer said she didn’t reveal the conversation with Guadagno until now because she feared no one would believe her. But, with Hoboken having received just $342,000 out of $1.8 billion in Sandy recovery aid from the state in the first funding round, she said, she is speaking out in hopes her city won’t be shut out in a second funding wave, when the state is due to disperse $1.4 billion. Hoboken has also received millions in federal aid.

Christie, meanwhile, is embroiled in another scandal that threatens to undercut his second term and future presidential ambitions. The U.S. attorney’s office and a state legislative panel are investigating allegations that Christie aides engineered traffic jams in Fort Lee by closing lanes to the George Washington Bridge, possibly as payback against the town’s Democratic mayor, who didn’t endorse Christie for re-election.

Democratic Assemblyman John Wisniewski, the legislator leading the state investigation, told NBC’s “Meet the Press” on Sunday that his committee would look into Zimmer’s political payback allegation as well.

“I think we have to give the allegations serious thought,” he said, “because this is a pattern we’ve heard time and time again throughout New Jersey.”

Former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani, a Republican, told “Meet the Press” that Wisniewski is part of a “partisan witch hunt” and should step down.

Wisniewski countered that his committee of eight Democrats and four Republicans is bipartisan and would continue its investigation.

The committee issued 20 new subpoenas Friday as the traffic jam plot reached deep into Christie’s administration; the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey, which runs the bridge; and Christie’s re-election campaign.

Zimmer said another member of Christie’s administration, Community Affairs Commissioner Richard Constable, approached her later in May to reiterate what the lieutenant governor had said. According to Zimmer, he told her Sandy aid “would start flowing” to Hoboken if she backed the development project.

Lisa Ryan, a spokesman for Constable, said Zimmer’s claim was false and questioned why she waited eight months to come forward. Ryan also asked why Zimmer didn’t take her concern to authorities “if she was so distraught.”

David Samson, whom Christie picked to chair the Port Authority, is among those subpoenaed. He is a founding partner of the law firm representing the Rockefeller Group, the New York City developer seeking to build commercial space in Hoboken. A lobbyist for the group, Lori Grifa, was a member of Christie’s administration before leaving to work for a law firm. Calls to the firm went unreturned over the weekend.

Wisniewski said he has no plans to subpoena the governor, and there is no evidence Christie knew about any lane closing scheme in advance.

 

1
Text Only
National News
  • Obama shows skepticism on Russia in Ukraine

    President Barack Obama conveyed skepticism Thursday about Russian promises to de-escalate a volatile situation in Ukraine, and said the United State and its allies are ready to impose fresh sanctions if Moscow doesn’t make good on its commitments.

    April 17, 2014

  • Judge in gay marriage case asks pointed questions

    A judge in Colorado who will play a pivotal role deciding whether gays should be allowed to wed in the United States asked pointed questions Thursday about whether Oklahoma can legally ban the unions.

    April 17, 2014

  • Cyber cops: Target hackers may take years to find

    Secret Service investigators say they are close to gaining a full understanding of the methods hackers used to breach Target’s computer systems last December.

    April 17, 2014

  • Court to weigh challenge to ban on campaign lies

    As political campaigns begin to heat up, the Supreme Court is deciding whether false accusations and mudslinging made during an election can be punished as a crime.

    April 16, 2014

  • Auto Show Nissan Hot _Cast.jpg Hot models at this year’s New York Auto Show

    With more than 1 million visitors annually, the New York International Auto Show is one of the most important shows for the U.S. auto industry.

    April 16, 2014 3 Photos

  • Transportation Blues 2.jpg Congress is giving states the transportation blues

    On the road in a tour bus this week, the U.S. transportation secretary is spreading some bad news: the government’s Highway Trust Fund is nearly broke.

    April 15, 2014 2 Photos

  • Report: Russia withheld intel before Boston attack

    A yearlong review of information the U.S. intelligence community had prior to the Boston Marathon bombing found that the investigation could have been more thorough.

    April 11, 2014

  • Obama Health Secretary.jpg Obama announces Sebelius resignation, successor

    President Barack Obama praised outgoing Health and Human Secretary Kathleen Sebelius for helping to steer his health care law’s comeback after a rocky rollout, even as he nominated a successor aimed at helping the White House move past the political damage.

    April 11, 2014 1 Photo

  • Police seek driver in deadly Florida day care crash

    As mourners trickled by Thursday to honor the 4-year-old girl who was killed and 14 others injured in a crash at a Florida day care, authorities scoured the state for the driver they said fled in the vehicle that caused the fatal wreck.

    April 10, 2014

  • Stephen Colbert-Late _Cast.jpg Stephen Colbert to replace Letterman on late show

    CBS moved swiftly Thursday to replace the retiring David Letterman with Comedy Central’s Stephen Colbert, who will take over the “Late Show” next year and do battle with Jimmy Fallon and Jimmy Kimmel for late-night television supremacy.

    April 10, 2014 1 Photo