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April 2015 Municipal Elections

Republican officials in a rural Arizona county have refused to certify the 2022 election despite no evidence of anything wrong with the count. The decision Monday was quickly challenged in court by the state’s top election official. The refusal to certify by Cochise County in southeastern Arizona comes amid pressure from prominent Republicans to reject results showing Democrats winning top races. Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, a Democrat who narrowly won the race for governor, asked a judge to order county officials to canvass the election, which she said is an obligation under Arizona law.

Democrats celebrating a successful effort to keep control of the U.S. Senate this year will soon confront a 2024 campaign that could prove more challenging. The Democratic Party enters the next cycle defending 23 Senate seats, including two held by independents who caucus with Democrats. That’s compared with just 10 Senate seats that Republicans hope to keep in their column. Several states that had costly and hotly contested Senate races this year will see a repeat in 2024. Those states include Nevada, Arizona, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Meanwhile, some states have become increasingly hostile to Democrats, including Montana, Ohio and West Virginia.

House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy is in the fight of his political life as he seeks enough GOP backing to become the next speaker of the House. The California congressman is grinding through the promises and proposals, cajoling and deal-making necessary to win over reluctant colleagues. He needs at least 218 votes to become Democrat Nancy Pelosi's successor. The overtures McCarthy is making include the symbolic and the substantive, but often come with a political cost. For example, he's promised to restore the committee assignments of a far-right Republican, Georgia's Marjorie Taylor Greene, and take them away from some high-profile Democrats. McCarthy remains confident of garnering enough support, saying that “we'll get there.”

Republicans are engaged in a round of finger-pointing as both parties sift through the results of Democrats’ stronger-than-expected showing in the midterm elections. But the recriminations obscure a much deeper dilemma for the party. Many of their nominees failed to raise the money needed to mount competitive campaigns. That forced party leaders, particularly in the Senate, to triage resources to races where they thought they had the best chance at winning. The lackluster fundraising allowed Democrats to get their message out to voters early and unchallenged, while GOP contenders lacked the resources to do the same.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she won't seek a leadership role in the new Congress. Pelosi’s decision Thursday comes after Democrats lost the House majority to Republicans in the midterm elections and after the brutal attack on her husband, Paul, by an intruder at their San Francisco home. Pelosi’s decision makes way for a new generation of House Democratic leaders. She plans to stay on as a member of Congress, having won reelection from her California district. Pelosi is the first and only woman to serve as speaker, breaking what she called the “marble ceiling.” She led passage of the Affordable Care Act with President Barack Obama and twice impeached President Donald Trump.

Election News Coverage

Republican officials in a rural Arizona county have refused to certify the 2022 election despite no evidence of anything wrong with the count. The decision Monday was quickly challenged in court by the state’s top election official. The refusal to certify by Cochise County in southeastern Arizona comes amid pressure from prominent Republicans to reject results showing Democrats winning top races. Secretary of State Katie Hobbs, a Democrat who narrowly won the race for governor, asked a judge to order county officials to canvass the election, which she said is an obligation under Arizona law.

Democrats celebrating a successful effort to keep control of the U.S. Senate this year will soon confront a 2024 campaign that could prove more challenging. The Democratic Party enters the next cycle defending 23 Senate seats, including two held by independents who caucus with Democrats. That’s compared with just 10 Senate seats that Republicans hope to keep in their column. Several states that had costly and hotly contested Senate races this year will see a repeat in 2024. Those states include Nevada, Arizona, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. Meanwhile, some states have become increasingly hostile to Democrats, including Montana, Ohio and West Virginia.

House Republican leader Kevin McCarthy is in the fight of his political life as he seeks enough GOP backing to become the next speaker of the House. The California congressman is grinding through the promises and proposals, cajoling and deal-making necessary to win over reluctant colleagues. He needs at least 218 votes to become Democrat Nancy Pelosi's successor. The overtures McCarthy is making include the symbolic and the substantive, but often come with a political cost. For example, he's promised to restore the committee assignments of a far-right Republican, Georgia's Marjorie Taylor Greene, and take them away from some high-profile Democrats. McCarthy remains confident of garnering enough support, saying that “we'll get there.”

Republicans are engaged in a round of finger-pointing as both parties sift through the results of Democrats’ stronger-than-expected showing in the midterm elections. But the recriminations obscure a much deeper dilemma for the party. Many of their nominees failed to raise the money needed to mount competitive campaigns. That forced party leaders, particularly in the Senate, to triage resources to races where they thought they had the best chance at winning. The lackluster fundraising allowed Democrats to get their message out to voters early and unchallenged, while GOP contenders lacked the resources to do the same.

NEW YORK (AP) — A day after Speaker Nancy Pelosi announced she would step aside, Rep. Hakeem Jeffries of New York launched a history-making bid Friday to become the first Black person to helm a major political party in Congress as leader of the House Democrats.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says she won't seek a leadership role in the new Congress. Pelosi’s decision Thursday comes after Democrats lost the House majority to Republicans in the midterm elections and after the brutal attack on her husband, Paul, by an intruder at their San Francisco home. Pelosi’s decision makes way for a new generation of House Democratic leaders. She plans to stay on as a member of Congress, having won reelection from her California district. Pelosi is the first and only woman to serve as speaker, breaking what she called the “marble ceiling.” She led passage of the Affordable Care Act with President Barack Obama and twice impeached President Donald Trump.

A push by top Kansas Republicans to punish party officials who backed an independent candidate for governor is shining a spotlight on an internal rift. The conflict involving state Sen. Dennis Pyle could hinder GOP leaders’ efforts to steer the state back to the right over Democratic Gov. Laura Kelly’s objections. Many Republicans blame Pyle’s campaign for Kelly’s narrow reelection victory Nov. 8 over three-term Republican state Attorney General Derek Schmidt. But five hard-right lawmakers said in a Facebook statement this week that GOP “establishment manipulations” were the culprit. They denounced the state party's chair for moving to sanction party officials who violated a party ban against supporting non-Republicans.

Republicans have won control of the U.S. House, returning the party to power in Washington and giving conservatives leverage to blunt President Joe Biden’s agenda and spur a flurry of investigations. But a threadbare majority will pose immediate challenges for GOP leaders and complicate the party’s ability to govern. More than a week after Election Day, Republicans secured the 218th seat needed to flip the House. The full scope of the party’s majority may not be clear for several more days — or weeks — as votes in competitive races are still being counted.

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