By Roger McKinney

rmckinney@joplinglobe.com

Downstream Casino Resort has provided a dramatic boost to Oklahoma revenue.

The Quapaw Tribe of Oklahoma in June 2008 provided revenues of $17,904 to the state from its Quapaw Casino in Miami, Okla. After the tribe’s Downstream Casino Resort opened in July, tribal revenue to the state increased to $323,591.

For the first six months of fiscal year 2009, the tribe’s revenues to the state from its two casinos total $1,917,086. That is money earned in June-November 2008 and received by the Oklahoma Office of State Finance in July-December 2008. Downstream Casino Resort was operating for five of those months.

For the same period of fiscal year 2008, the tribe’s revenues to the state came to $133,533.

The figures are from the Oklahoma Office of State Finance, Gaming Compliance.

“We are very proud to support Gov. (Brad) Henry and his efforts to provide much-needed resources to the people,” John Berrey, chairman of the Quapaw tribe’s business committee, said of the numbers in a statement to the Globe.

Under an agreement with tribes that run casinos, the tribes provide 4 percent to 6 percent of revenues from electronic games and 10 percent of revenues from table games to the state.

Derek Campbell, gaming compliance head with the Office of State Finance, has said all Oklahoma tribes operate under the same agreement.

State revenues from other area tribes with casinos have declined for the fiscal year so far, with a few exceptions.

n State revenues from the Eastern Shawnee Tribe, which owns Bordertown Casino at Wyandotte, Okla., are $694,912 for the first six months of the fiscal year. That’s an increase from $479,995 for the same period of fiscal year 2008. The tribe’s total to the state for the last fiscal year (which ended June 30) was $1,113,250.

n State revenue from the Seneca-Cayuga Tribe, which owns Grand Lake Casino at Grove, Okla., totaled $272,301 for the first half of the fiscal year, a slight increase from $261,894 for the same period of the last fiscal year. The revenue total for the 2008 fiscal year from the tribe was $493,093.

n The Peoria Tribe, with Buffalo Run Casino at Miami, has provided revenues totaling $289,084 to the state so far this fiscal year. That’s down from $340,231 in the first half of fiscal 2008. The total for the fiscal year was $765,443.

n The Miami Tribe owns The Stables in Miami, along with the Modoc Tribe. State revenues from the Miami Tribe for the first half of the fiscal year total $181,353, a slight decrease from $182,115 in the first half of fiscal 2008. The state’s total from the tribe for the fiscal year was $390,859.

n The Ottawa Tribe has High Winds Casino at Miami. Its revenues to the state total $79,977 for the first six months of the fiscal year, a slight decline from $80,581 for the same period of fiscal 2008. The tribe’s total for fiscal 2008 was $168,094.

n State revenues from the Wyandotte Nation, which owns Wyandotte Nation Casino in Wyandotte, Okla., totaled $206,517 for the first half of the state’s fiscal year. That’s a sharp decline from $341,944 in the first half of the 2008 fiscal year. For all of fiscal year 2008, the tribe’s revenues to the state totaled $679,170.



Gaming revenue

Oklahoma’s revenue from tribal casinos came to $50,771,363 for the first six months of fiscal year 2009. That’s up from $38,600,091 for the same period one year earlier. State revenues from the tribes totaled $81,423,554 for all of fiscal 2008.

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